Banknote Features

New $5 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    1 September 2016
    Size
    65mm by 130mm
    Concept Designer
    emerystudio
  • Security Feature Rolling colour effect

    Tilt the banknote to see a rolling colour effect, which is visible on both sides of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Top to bottom window

    Look for multiple security features in the clear top-to-bottom window.

  • Security Feature Flying Eastern Spinebill

    Tilt the banknote to see the Eastern Spinebill move its wings and change colour.

  • Design Feature Eastern Spinebill

    The banknote designer's interpretation of the bird species Eastern Spinebill (Acanthorhynchus tenuirostris).

  • Security Feature Reversing 5

    Tilt the banknote to see the number ‘5’ change direction within the Federation Pavilion.

  • Design Feature Prickly Moses

    Prickly Moses Photograph

    The banknote designer's interpretation of the wattle species Prickly Moses (Acacia verticillata subsp. ovoidea).

  • Design Feature Tactile Feature

    Feel for a raised bump on each of the long edges of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    The Queen's portrait is based on photographs commissioned by the Reserve Bank in 1984.

  • Security Feature Federation Star

    Look for a Federation Star in a small clear window.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink

    Look for an Eastern Spinebill that fluoresces under UV light.

  • Design Feature New Parliament House

    This depiction of the New Parliament House is the designer's interpretation of various photographs. The New Parliament House was opened in 1988 by Queen Elizabeth II.

  • Design Feature Forecourt Mosaic

    The artwork is the designer's interpretation of various architectural photographs of the Forecourt Mosaic. The Forecourt Mosaic is based on a Central Desert dot-style painting by Michael Nelson Jagamara titled ‘Possum and Wallaby Dreaming’.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Clearly defined multi-coloured and multi-directional fine-line patterns appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Security Feature 3D Federation Star

    Tilt the banknote to see a three-dimensional Federation Star with a colourful border.

  • Security Feature Colourful Eastern Spinebill

    Tilt the banknote to see colours change within the Eastern Spinebill.

  • Design Feature Federation Pavilion

    Federation Pavilion was the site of the official ceremony that marked the proclamation of the Commonwealth of Australia. The image is the designer's interpretation of various architectural photographs.

  • Security Feature Rolling colour effect

    Tilt the banknote to see a rolling colour effect, which is visible on both sides of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Floor plan

    This visual element is based on the aerial view of Parliament House building, including the House of Representatives, Senate and sporting facilities.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Feel the distinctive texture of the raised, dark printing.

  • Security Feature Microprint

    Look for tiny, clearly defined text in multiple locations on the banknote.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink

    Look for a serial number and year of print that fluoresce under UV light.

New $10 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    20 September 2017
    Size
    65mm by 137mm
    Concept Designer
    emerystudio
  • Security Feature Rolling colour effect

    Tilt the banknote to see a rolling colour effect, which is visible on both sides of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Top to bottom window

    Look for multiple security features in the clear top-to-bottom window.

  • Design Feature Pen Nib

    Photograph of a Pen Nib

    The image of the nib of a pen is representative of Gilmore and Paterson's works as writers.

  • Security Feature Flying Cockatoo

    Tilt the banknote to see the Cockatoo move its wings and change colour.

  • Design Feature Sulphur-crested Cockatoo

    The banknote designer's interpretation of the bird species Sulphur-crested Cockatoo (Cacatua galerita).

  • Security Feature Reversing 10

    Tilt the banknote to see the number ‘10’ change direction within the homestead.

  • Design Feature Bramble Wattle

    Bramble Wattle Photograph

    The banknote designer's interpretation of the Bramble Wattle (Acacia victoriae).

  • Design Feature Tactile Feature

    Feel for two raised bumps on each of the long edges of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Portrait of AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson

    This portrait of AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson is based on a photograph taken when he returned from the Boer War in 1900.

    Read AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson's biography.

  • Design Feature Horseman

    Horseman

    This image is the designer's interpretation of a horseman from the era of Paterson's writing.

  • Security Feature Microprint

    Look for tiny, clearly defined text in multiple locations on the banknote. This includes excerpts from The Man from Snowy River. ‘TEN DOLLARS’ is also microprinted in the coloured background.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink

    Look for a Cockatoo and wattle branch that fluoresce under UV light.

  • Security Feature Pen Nib

    Look for a pen nib in a small clear window.

  • Design Feature Hut

    This image references life in the Australian bushland as described in Gilmore's poetry. The image is based on a photograph from the 1800s.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Clearly defined multicoloured fine-line patterns appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore

    This portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore is based on a photograph of the poet taken when she was in her early twenties. National Library of Australia, Manuscripts Collection ‘MS 1662/5/5/71’.

  • Security Feature 3D Pen Nib

    Tilt the banknote to see a three-dimensional pen nib with a colourful border.

  • Security Feature Colourful Cockatoo

    Tilt the banknote to see colours change within the Cockatoo's crest.

  • Design Feature Homestead

    This building is representative of the type of homestead referenced in Gilmore and Paterson's works.

  • Security Feature Rolling colour effect

    Tilt the banknote to see a rolling colour effect, which is visible on both sides of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Gilmore at her desk

    This image is based on a 1952 photograph sourced from the Herald and Weekly Times Limited portrait collection, Pictures Collection, State Library of Victoria.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Feel the distinctive texture of the raised, dark printing.

  • Security Feature Microprint

    Look for tiny, clearly defined text in multiple locations on the banknote. This includes excerpts from the No Foe Shall Gather Our Harvest. ‘TEN DOLLARS’ is also microprinted in the coloured background.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink

    Look for a serial number and year of print that fluoresce under UV light.

NEW $20 Banknote

NEW $50 Banknote

New $100 Banknote

$5 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    7 July 1992
    Date of Issue
    24 April 1995 (recoloured)
    Size
    65mm by 130mm
    Designer
    Bruce Stewart
  • Design Feature Eucalyptus leaves

    Eucalyptus leaves

    The banknote designer's rendition of eucalyptus leaves was inspired by the species Scribbly Gum.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    Portrait of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

    The Queen's portrait is based on photographs commissioned by the Reserve Bank in 1984. The Queen gave her approval for use of this image on an Australian banknote in 1988.

  • Security Feature Microprinting

    Microprinting

    Microprint is very small but well-defined text that usually requires a magnifying glass to read. On the $5 banknote the microprint says ‘FIVE DOLLARS’ and is located on the upper left, above the image of gum leaves.

  • Security Feature Shadow image

    close up of shadow image on $5 note

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a shadow image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen faintly, under other printing.

  • Security Feature Clear window – vignette of gum flower

    Clear window - vignette of gum flower

    On all genuine banknotes the window should be very clear and look like it's an integral part of the banknote, not an addition. Inside the clear window on the $5 banknote there is a printed image of a stylised gum flower.

  • Security Feature See-through registration device

    See-through registration device

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a seven-pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the banknote combining perfectly with three points on the other side.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Background print (offset)

    Multi-coloured and multi-directional patterns of fine lines appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Design Feature Landscape plan for New Parliament House

    Landscape plan for New Parliament House

    This visual element is based on the Design Development Landscape Plan for the New Parliament House.

  • Design Feature Parliament House

    Parliament House

    These depictions of Australia's Old and New Parliament Houses are the designer's interpretation of architectural drawings and photographs. The Old Parliament House was opened in 1927 and the New Parliament House was opened in 1988.

  • Design Feature Geometric patterns

    Geometric patterns

    The patterns here reflect architectural items of the entrance to the ministerial wing of the New Parliament House and the skylights for the Members' Hall and the Main Committee Room.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink properties

    Fluorescent ink properties

    Under ultraviolet light, the serial number on the back of the $5 banknote glows and a square patch becomes visible.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Intaglio print

    Intaglio is raised dark printing with a distinct feel. It's used for the portraits on banknotes and some other design elements.

$10 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    1 November 1993
    Size
    65mm by 137mm
    Designer
    Max Robinson
  • Design Feature Horseman

    Horseman

    This image is the banknote designer's interpretation of an authentic horseman from the times of The Man From Snowy River.

  • Design Feature Portrait of AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson

    Portrait of AB 'Banjo' Paterson

    This portrait of AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson is based on a photograph taken at the time of his return from the Boer War in 1900.

    Read AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson's biography.

  • Design Feature Running horses (brumbies)

    Running horses (brumbies)

    Inspired by the poem The Man From Snowy River, these images of horses are based on pictures that appeared in The Australian Newspaper in 1870 and The Illustrated Sydney News in 1875.

  • Design Feature Waltzing Matilda logo

    Waltzing Matilda logo

    This design element is taken from the 1903 publication of Marie Cowan's arrangement of Waltzing Matilda, which was used at the time to promote Billy Tea.

  • Security Feature Microprinting

    Microprinting

    On the $10 banknote, microprinted lines from AB ‘Banjo’ Paterson's poem The Man From Snowy River are located near his portrait. On the other side, excerpts from the poem No Foe Shall Gather Our Harvest are microprinted near the image of Dame Mary Gilmore.

  • Security Feature Clear window – vignette of a windmill

    Clear window - vignette of a windmill

    On all genuine banknotes the window should be very clear and look like it's an integral part of the banknote, not an addition. Inside the clear window on the $10 banknote there is a printed image of a stylised windmill and an embossed wave pattern.

  • Security Feature Shadow Image

    close up of shadow image on $10 note

    When the banknote is held up to the light, an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen faintly, under other printing.

  • Security Feature See-through registration device

    See-through registration device

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a seven-pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the banknote combining perfectly with three points on the other side.

  • Design Feature Woman of the outback and outback scene

    This imagery of a country woman and the surrounding landscape was inspired by the themes of many of Mary Gilmore's writings.

  • Design Feature Bullock team carrying wool

    Bullock team carrying wool

    The image of a bullock team is based on an engraving entitled ‘The Wool Season’ that appeared in The Illustrated Australian News in 1881.

  • Design Feature Dobell portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore

    The source for this design element is a portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore by the painter Sir William Dobell. It was painted in 1957 and hangs in the Art Gallery of NSW.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore

    Portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore

    This portrait of Dame Mary Gilmore is based on a photograph of the poet taken when she was in her early twenties.

    Read Dame Mary Gilmore's biography.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Background print (offset)

    Multi-coloured and multi-directional patterns of fine lines appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink properties

    Fluorescent ink properties

    Under ultraviolet light, the serial numbers on the back of the $10 banknote glow.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Intaglio print

    Intaglio is raised dark printing with a distinct feel. It's used for the portraits on banknotes and some other design elements.

$20 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    31 October 1994
    Size
    65mm by 144mm
    Designer
    Garry Emery
  • Design Feature Schooner Mercury

    Schooner Mercury

    The schooner Mercury was completed in Sydney in 1806. It was owned for a time by Mary Reibey. This image is based on an illustration commissioned by the Reserve Bank in 1993.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Mary Reibey

    Portrait of Mary Reibey

    This image is based on a miniature watercolour painted on ivory that is held at the State Library of New South Wales. It is the only known portrait of pioneer businesswoman Mary Reibey.

    Read Mary Reibey's biography.

  • Design Feature Building

    Building

    This building in Sydney's George Street was once owned by Mary Reibey and comprised shops and dwellings. The image is based on an illustration in a book entitled Sydney in 1848.

  • Security Feature Microprinting

    Microprinting

    Microprint is very small but well-defined text that usually requires a magnifying glass to read. The words ‘TWENTY DOLLARS’ are microprinted on the $20 banknote.

  • Security Feature Shadow Image

    close up of shadow image on $20 note

    When the banknote is held up to the light, an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen faintly, under other printing.

  • Security Feature Clear window – vignette of a compass

    Clear window - vignette of a compass

    On all genuine banknotes the window should be very clear and look like it's an integral part of the banknote, not an addition. Inside the clear window on the $20 banknote is an image of a compass, along with embossing of the number ‘20’.

  • Security Feature See-through registration device

    See-through registration device

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a seven-pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the banknote combining perfectly with three points on the other side.

  • Design Feature Air ambulance Victory

    Air ambulance 'Victory'

    The air ambulance Victory flew the first Flying Doctor mission from Cloncurry, Queensland, on 17 May 1928 after Qantas entered into a unique venture with Reverend John Flynn of the Australian Inland Mission Service.

  • Design Feature Pedal generator

    Pedal generator

    This is an interpretation of one of the first pedal-powered generators to operate the transceiver wireless sets, the sole method of communication on outback stations.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Reverend John Flynn

    Portrait of Reverend John Flynn

    This portrait of Reverend John Flynn, founder of the Royal Flying Doctor Service, is based on an original photograph held by the National Library of Australia.

    Read Reverend John Flynn's biography.

  • Design Feature Camel and rider (Flynn boundary rider)

    Camel and rider (Flynn boundary rider)

    This image is based on a photograph taken of Reverend Col Harland in 1919 and provided by the National Library of Australia. Reverend John Flynn purchased five camels in 1913 for his ‘Patrol Padres’, who undertook mission work throughout central Australia.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Background print (offset)

    Multi-coloured and multi-directional patterns of fine lines appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink properties

    Fluorescent ink properties

    Under ultraviolet light, the serial numbers on the back of the $20 banknote glow and a patch showing the value of the banknote becomes visible.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Intaglio print

    Intaglio is raised dark printing with a distinct feel. It's used for the portraits on banknotes and some other design elements.

$50 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    4 October 1995
    Size
    65mm by 151mm
    Designer
    Brian Sadgrove
  • Design Feature Mission church at Point McLeay

    This image depicts the mission church at Point McLeay as it was in the late 19th century. Point McLeay (the Aboriginal name is Raukkan) is the community where David Unaipon's people live.

  • Design Feature Portrait of David Unaipon

    Portrait of David Unaipon

    This portrait of David Unaipon, an inventor and Australia's first published Aboriginal author, is based on an original photograph taken in 1938.

    Read David Unaipon's biography.

  • Design Feature Diagrams of Unaipon's patent application

    Diagrams of Unaipon's patent application

    This element is based on drawings from David Unaipon's 1909 patent application for an improved mechanical handpiece for sheep shearing.

  • Design Feature Manuscript

    Manuscript

    This is an extract from David Unaipon's handwritten preface to his story Legendary Tales of the Australian Aborigines. It's based on copies of the original manuscript provided by the State Library of New South Wales.

  • Security Feature Microprinting

    Microprinting

    Microprint is very small but well-defined text that usually requires a magnifying glass to read. On the $50 banknote, the words ‘FIFTY DOLLARS’ are microprinted.

  • Security Feature See-through registration device

    See-through registration device

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a seven-pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the banknote combining perfectly with three points on the other side.

  • Security Feature Clear window – vignette of the Southern Cross

    Clear window – vignette of the Southern Cross

    On all genuine banknotes the window should be very clear and look like it's an integral part of the banknote, not an addition. Inside the clear window on the $50 banknote is a printed image of the Southern Cross, along with embossing of the number ‘50’.

  • Security Feature Shadow Image

    close up of shadow image on $50 note

    When the banknote is held up to the light, an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen faintly, under other printing.

  • Design Feature WA Parliament House

    WA Parliament House

    This drawing shows the original front of the West Australian Parliament House, as it was in the 1920s when Edith Cowan was an MP.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Edith Cowan

    Portrait of Edith Cowan

    This portrait of Edith Cowan, who is best remembered as the first female member of an Australian parliament, was based on a 1929 photograph from the biographical register of West Australian Parliament.

    Read Edith Cowan's biography.

  • Design Feature Foster mother and state children

    Foster mother and state children

    This composite illustration represents a foster mother and children who were wards of the state circa 1920.

  • Design Feature Cowan at lectern

    Cowan at lectern

    This image of Edith Cowan at a lectern represents her frequent public speaking on matters such as women's rights and children's welfare issues.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Background print (offset)

    Multi-coloured and multi-directional patterns of fine lines appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink properties

    Fluorescent ink properties

    Under ultraviolet light, the serial numbers on the back of the $50 banknote glow and a patch showing the value of the banknote becomes visible.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Intaglio print

    Intaglio is raised dark printing with a distinct feel. It's used for the portraits on banknotes and some other design elements.

$100 Banknote

  • Date of First Issue
    15 May 1996
    Size
    65mm by 158mm
    Designer
    Bruce Stewart
  • Design Feature Her Majesty's Theatre

    Her Majesty's Theatre

    This image is based on a 1903 photograph of the interior of Her Majesty's Theatre in Sydney. A performance at this theatre in September 1911 was a highlight of Dame Nellie Melba's career.

  • Design Feature ‘Melba’ signature

    ‘Melba’ signature

    This design element is based on Dame Nellie Melba's signature, which appeared on the program used for her farewell performance at the Royal Albert Hall, London in June 1926.

  • Design Feature Melba Australian Concert Tour program (1902)

    Melba Australian Concert Tour program (1902)

    The 1902 Australian Concert Tour is of special significance as it was Dame Nellie Melba's first return to Australia from her successful overseas performances. The monogram on the program was designed by Dame Nellie Melba.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Dame Nellie Melba

    Portrait of Dame Nellie Melba

    Dame Nellie Melba achieved international recognition as a soprano and enjoyed star status within Australia. This portrait is based on a photograph that appeared in a 1909 biography by Agnes G. Murphy.

    Read Dame Nellie Melba's biography.

  • Security Feature Microprinting

    Microprinting

    Microprint is very small but well-defined text that usually requires a magnifying glass to read. On the $100 banknote the words ‘ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS’ and the number ‘100’ are microprinted.

  • Security Feature See-through registration device

    See-through registration device

    When the banknote is held up to the light, a seven-pointed star within a circle is formed by four points on one side of the banknote combining perfectly with three points on the other side.

  • Security Feature Clear window – vignette of a lyrebird

    Clear window – vignette of a lyrebird

    On all genuine banknotes the window should be very clear and look like it's an integral part of the banknote, not an addition. Inside the clear window on the $100 banknote is an image of a lyrebird, along with embossing of the number ‘100’.

  • Security Feature Shadow Image

    close up of shadow image on $100 note

    When the banknote is held up to the light, an image of the Australian Coat of Arms can be seen faintly, under other printing.

  • Design Feature Rising Sun badge

    This Rising Sun badge was adopted as the Australian Imperial Force badge and worn in World War I. Permission to use the badge on the $100 banknote was provided by the Australian Army.

  • Design Feature Cavalry

    Cavalry

    This is the designer's interpretation of mounted soldiers in World War I.

  • Design Feature Portrait of Sir John Monash

    Portrait of Sir John Monash

    This portrait is based on a photograph of Sir John Monash taken in 1912. Monash was one of Australia's greatest military commanders.

    Read Sir John Monash's biography.

  • Design Feature Gunners and 18-pounder field gun

    Gunners and 18-pounder field gun

    Based primarily on a photograph taken in 1917 entitled Artillery in Noreuil Valley, this image shows batteries of the 2nd Australian Division attacking the Hindenburg Line.

  • Security Feature Background print (offset)

    Background print (offset)

    Multi-coloured and multi-directional patterns of fine lines appear on each side of the banknote.

  • Security Feature Fluorescent ink properties

    Fluorescent ink properties

    Under ultraviolet light, the serial numbers on the back of the $100 banknote glow and a patch showing the value of the banknote becomes visible.

  • Security Feature Intaglio print

    Intaglio print

    Intaglio is raised dark printing with a distinct feel. It's used for the portraits on banknotes and some other design elements.